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Új könyv az Európai Dokumentációs Központban

Anne L.M. Keirse - Marco B.M. Loos: Alternative Ways to Ius Commune : the europeanisation of private law. Intersentia, Cheltenham, UK, 2012,
ISBN: 978 1 84844 678 6

In 2011, two major instruments of European contract law were published: the 2011 Consumer Rights Directive (CRD) was enacted and the proposal for a Common European Sales Law (CESL) was launched. Both instruments aim at improving the internal market. Whereas the CRD aims at B2C contracts, the CESL may be applied, as an optional instrument, both to B2C and B2B contracts. In this book, both instruments are discussed. Decock and Chirita approach the CRD from an historical and a competition law perspective; Van Schagen argues that the way the CESL is drafted endangers its chances of being applied in practice. De Bruijn, Dang Vu, Kruisinga, Jansen and Keirse address several matters regarding the remedies for non-conformity under the CESL. The book opens, however, with three more general papers. Loos and Keirse first address the development of European private law, from the 1975 Consumer Policy Programme to the CRD and the CESL. Wouters addresses the relationship between private law, global governance and the European Union, and Boele-Woelki draws attention to the harmonisation of European matrimonial property law. This book thus represents the most important developments in the area of European private law. As such, it will provide important insights for the practitioner and academic interested in the course of these developments.

Új könyv az Európai Dokumentációs Központban

Diamond Ashiagbor, Nicola Countouris, Ioannis Lianos: The European Union after the Treaty of Lisbon. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2012,
ISBN: 9781107017573

This volume of essays casts light on the shape and future direction of the EU in the wake of the Lisbon Treaty and highlights the incomplete nature of the reforms. Contributors analyse some of the most innovative and most controversial aspects of the Treaty, such as the role and nature of the EU Charter of Fundamental Rights and the relationship between the EU and the European Court of Human Rights. In addition, they reflect on the ongoing economic and financial crisis in the Euro area, which has forced the EU Member States to re-open negotiations and update a number of aspects of the Lisbon 'settlement'. Together, the essays provide a variety of insights into some of the most crucial innovations introduced by the Lisbon Treaty and in the context of the adoption of the new European Financial Stability Mechanism.